Ketasco Alumni Of North America Donates Water Tower To Ketasco

By: Vincent Kosi

Water tower under construction

The Ketasco past students in North America have come together to raise funds to build a water tower for the girls’ dormitory which has been affected by water shortage ever since the old tower collapsed.

The president of the association Mr. Grant Ayayee (1975) stated that he received SOS call from the headmaster of the school, Mr. Sedeanu Kwao, to mobilize funds for the singular purpose of getting this project underway.

Within a space of two months, members of the association selflessly donated various amounts of money to get the project underway.

The association in North America has as its aim of aggregating resources to ensure that such short term projects are undertaken without hitch to ensure a tranquil environment for teaching and learning.

With a new status as a 501c3, the association is gearing up its efforts to look for avenues to get materials and funds to their alma mater in the very near future. A call is therefore being sent out to all those who care for a good cause to show their generosity to such a just cause, a cause that is meant not to benefit members directly but to a school that shaped them into what they are today.

 

Source: modernghana.com

New Website Promotes Urban Sanitation Innovation In Ghana

ACCRA, 23 February 2017 – The Sanitation Challenge for Ghana (SC4Gh) team has announced a new website to promote the urban sanitation innovation Prize.

Conventional interventions have failed to solve the sanitation crisis facing over 85% households in Ghana. To address this, the SC4Gh was launched in 2015, with a particular focus on urban liquid waste management. The challenge offers prize money worth GBP 1.426 million to Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs), who develop and implement the most innovative solutions to increase access to sustainable sanitation services for all urban households.

The new website, sanitationchallenge4ghana.org – offers better access to information and updates about the contest, information on the 17 MMDAs that have reached the 2nd phase of the challenge, frequently asked questions, and a compilation of approaches and tools for implementing liquid waste management strategies.

Speaking on the launch of the website, Vida Duti, the IRC Ghana Country Director said:

“We are excited to be part of this inducement prize for MMDAs, working with government as the local implementing agent of the SC4Gh. Stage 1 (Duapa Awards) of the contest was hugely successful with 48 entries and 21 MMDAs winning awards. Stage 2 (Dignified City Award) of the SC4Gh, which focuses on implementation of liquid waste management strategies, is in progress as planned with 17 out of the 21 MMDAs vying for the ultimate prize. IRC will continue to support Ghana towards the achievement of its national WASH vision; ‘To provide sustained and appropriate water and sanitation services to all citizens by 2025.’ My hope is the redesigned website and its resources will contribute to this.”

Be part of the innovative solution and join the campaign that rewards excellence in urban liquid waste management strategies. Welcome to the new SC4Gh website!

 

Source: modernghana.com

Recognize WASH As a Climate Adaptation Strategy — WASH Actors in Ghana Advises

Inadequate knowledge or lack of it on climate change issues and how it affects the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector among Ghanaians has been identified as one of the major inhibiting factors militating against the country’s effort at combating climate change in Ghana. Policy makers and majority of actors in the WASH sector either lack adequate knowledge of climate change issues or how it impact on WASH or generally does not have interest on climate change.

That according to actors in the WASH sector account for the haphazard implementation of climate changes strategies and low understanding of the climate change among the populace and therefore called on policy implementers, civil society and all WASH sectors actors to intensify their learning and sensetisation activities on WASH based climate adaptation strategies in the Ghana. They also called for WASH to be recognized as climate change adaptation strategy. These were among a myriad of sentiments echoed by WASH sector actors at the fifty-eighth (58) edition of the National Level Learning Alliance Platform in Accra.

The 58TH NLLAP took place on Thursday 3RD November, 2016 on the theme, WASH Based Climate Adaptation Strategies in Ghana. Dr. Chaka Uzondu, Ag. Head of Policy, Advocacy and Campaigns Department of WaterAid Ghana made the first presentation on “Climate Change is Water Change, So Should Ghana Prioritize Human Water Centered Adaptation as Our Key Response to Climate Change?” Dr. Emmanuel Tachie-Obeng of the Ghana Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) gave an insight into the “National Climate Change Policy Framework in Ghana.” Lovans Owusu-Takyi, Director, Institute for Sustainable Energy and Environmental Solutions (ISEES) took actors in the WASH sector through “Climate Smart Solutions for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene.” NLLAP 58 was chaired by the Executive Secretary of the Water Resources Commission, Ben Y. Ampomah.

According to WaterAid Ghana (WAG) and the Ghana Youth Environment Movement (GYEM) the National Climate Change Policy (NCCP) which is Ghana’s policy response to climate change, must provide the vision and guiding framework for an integrated response to climate change and that they added must be anchored to the national sustainable development priorities such as:

  1. Agriculture and food security, (2) Disaster preparedness and response, (3) Natural resource management, (4) Equitable social development, (5) Energy, industrial and infrastructural development.

Stakeholders were also clear on the fact that, adequate steps have not been taken at national and local levels to strengthen resilience to climate change/variability. They also contend that, climate change policies and strategies have been weakly decentralised; and adaptation strategies are not well elaborated and WASH in particular is not recognised as a fundamental adaptation strategy. In this regard, WAG and GYEM are of the view that Climate Change has an enormous impact on water and with the increasingly volatile and insecurity in the availability of water in the right quantities, communities require access to water and sanitation if they are to survive and thrive in the face of the change. In view of that, WAG and GYEM recommends that:

  1. WASH Should Be Recognized As a Climate Adaptation Strategy

By that, WAG and GYEM are urging the Government of Ghana, the agencies and institutions responsible for implementing the National Climate Change Policy (NCCP) and the National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy (NACCAS) as well as developing partners to recognize the rights to WASH as a climate adaptation strategy.

  1. Stakeholders Should Develop and Implement Robust WASH Based Climate Adaptation Strategies

To achieve this, WAG and GYEM has called on implementing bodies of the programme of actions to develop, implement and promote sustainable WASH based climate adaptation strategies such as, rain harvesting technologies, waste management infrastructure, tree planting programs, water resources management systems and the provision of adequate sanitation facilities in public places(e.g. Health care facilities, Schools, major markets and transportation hubs)

  1. WASH Based Climate Adaptation Strategies Should Be Decentralized

To achieve the desired results, WAG and GYEM have suggested that, implementing institutions should mainstream WASH based climate adaptation strategies at the local government level and commit to supporting participation in programs at the Metropolitan, Municipal, and District levels through capacity strengthening and technical support to officers and officials of all MMDAs in the areas such as; climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. Additionally, MMDAs need to develop Water Security Plans that are appropriately funded and implemented.

  1. Efforts to Achieve Full WASH Coverage by 2025 Should Be Strengthened

The Government and implementing bodies of WASH and climate adaptation strategies should form an effective and efficient partnership to work towards ensuring full WASH coverage for all by 2025 through the implementation of all the WASH based climate adaptation strategies outlined in the NCAAS and the GH-INDC document.

  1. Sustainable Finance for Full and Effective Implementation of WASH Based Climate Adaptation Strategies to Reduce Inequalities Should Be Provided.

To achieve results, the Natural Resources, Environment and Climate Change Unit (NRECC) of the Ministry of Finance has been urged to coordinate and track the flow of funds from both domestic and international sources for the implementation of WASH and climate adaptation strategies and make sustainable funding available from the national level down to the local level. To this end, a conscious link should be created between the Ministry of Local Government & Rural Development (MLGRD), the Local Government Service and the MMDAs to ensure regular flow of funds to the local levels. WAG and GYEM is of the firm believe that local leaders and community members should be empowered to play leadership roles in the monitoring and implementation of climate resilient WASH projects.

  1. Parliamentary Oversight on WASH and Climate Adaptation Finance Delivery Should Be Enhanced

Stakeholders at the forum also called on Parliament to recognize and make WASH a priority. Stakeholders contend that, Parliament, especially, the Parliamentary Select Committee on Environment, Science and Technology should push for adequate allocation of budgetary support to climate changes issues and institutions. The Parliamentary Select Committee should strengthen legislation that would enable MMDAs to receive the technical and financial support to develop integrated adaptation plans that are aligned with their national planning systems and development goals.

  1. Civil Society Should be Engaged More in WASH and Climate Adaptation Program of Actions

The success of any WASH and Climate Adaptation Programme according stakeholders depends on Government’s ability to engage with CSOs and all implementing bodies of WASH Based Climate Adaptation Strategies. For CSOs and Implementing bodies to play their advocacy roles effectively they require the needed knowledge and skills set, and to achieve that, WAG and GYEM further suggested that their capacities should be strengthen.

  1. More Youth Should Be Given Adequate Roles in Decision Making on WASH and Climate Change Adaptation

WASH sector actors says the youth of Ghana are endowed with so much talent and therefore must be involved in all activities intended to promote or implement WASH and climate adaptation strategies by the Government and implementing bodies through the National Youth Authority (NYA) as well as involving the NYA in all decision-making processes and programme of actions both local and national level. Implementing bodies should use youth friendly outlets like social media, entertainment, and other educational platforms to ensure active and diverse youth participation in the process.

Specific Recommendations
Participants at the end of the NLLAP 58 proposed the following:

  • That school level activities with behaviour change communication materials and tree-growing activities with integration of water harvesting should be scaled-up.
  • That, there is the need to increase awareness/education on climate change issues in general and WASH in particular
  • That implementation of WASH and climate change related issues should be harmonised
  • That, policy makers should create more knowledge sharing and learning opportunities to educate themselves on climate change related issues
  • That, the youth should be engaged adequately on climate change & WASH issues
  • That, monitoring the implementation of climate-related activities at the community level should be intensified as well as identify clearly the actors engaged in the monitoring.
  • That, there is the need to deepen people/citizens understanding of the climate change vis-à-vis WASH
  • That, there is the need for WASH Climate Resilient Development: since, “Climate Change is WASH Change”
  • That programmes for and engagement of the media should be intensified
  • That, a Communication Strategy for effective dissemination of climate change issues at all levels— regions, district and community should put in place.
  • That, the role of CSOs in the climate change interventions—monitoring implementing agencies and issues of accountability should be highlighted.

The NLLAP is a WASH sector multi stakeholder platform with the overall goal of improving sector learning and dialogue. It is hosted by the Ghana WASH Resource Centre Network (RCN). The platform offers learning and sharing opportunity for sector players as one of the practical approaches to improving sector engagements/sharing with the long term aim of achieving a knowledge driven WASH sector that delivers quality and sustainable services in Ghana. NLLAP meetings take place on the last Thursday of every month and opened to all interested parties. The discussions of each NLLAP meetings are summarised and shared with wider WASH community. The topics of upcoming meetings are decided on by the RCN secretariat and a list of upcoming meetings can be found on the RCN website www.washghana.net .

 

Source: modernghana.com

 Ms. Veronica Ayi-Bonte

The issue of governance has become fundamental in every human endeavor. Governance permeates every societal fabric including corporate institutions, nation building and the provision of essential social services such as WASH services. It was therefore no wonder that the issue of governance featured prominently at the 27th edition of the Mole Conference at Big Ada in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.

Governance, according to WASH sector actors, remains a prominent feature that actors encounter in the sector and that they said is not limited to only the central Government, but also features prominently in the rural sub-sector in Ghana. Governance is also encountered at the local government level.

Contributing to discussions on Advocacy and Governance at the 27th Mole Conference, the Learning and Advocacy Manager of IRC Ghana, Ms. Veronica Ayi-Bonte said effective governance was required at the community level in the management of WASH system. “How well or not the communities manage these WASH systems will determine whether your facility will continue to work or how it will wane down and I think governance is important in order for our systems to be sustained.” Ms. Ayi-Bonte stressed.

She said recent works done in the WASH sector regarding WASH systems, has revealed that there are about 30,000 systems in the country, most of which are in the rural sub-sector and its being operated and managed by Community Based Organizations (CBOs), and WSMTs and effective governance is required to make these systems work.

According to Ms. Ayi-Bonte, Governance is required not just at the political level, but at the District Assembly and national level in order to ensure that the gains made so far can be consolidated.

“We realized that we do need strong Civil Society to improve governance, we are at different levels, we are everywhere, as we sit here, some of us work at the national level, some at the international level, some work at the regional level and district levels and some at the community level, and we need to be able to pull in all our efforts as one group of people in order to see the change at the various levels we are looking at,” Ms. Ayi-Bonte urged.

Within the partnerships, the IRC Ghana Learning and Advocacy Manager said stakeholders in the WASH sector need to understand how they work in the decentralized systems and to be effective, she said they need to integrate their efforts.

According to Ms. Ayi-Bonte, the greatest challenge in the WASH sector is the number of people who have not been reached with WASH services as a result of issues such as ground water problems, availability of water, difficult to reach areas, technology choices and explained further that all that are issues that made those areas difficult to live in and therefore called for concerted efforts to reach the unserved, and “that is what we do, and that is what CSOs should be doing, reaching the most people that people cannot see and we need to be able to build on that,” she emphasized.

On how to promote governance in the WASH sector in Ghana, Ms. Ayi-Bonte said it was important for WASH sectors to know who they are, define what their interests are and appreciate how the stakeholders can use each other in different circumstances to achieve the delivery of quality services.

“We all do different aspect of it, some of us do campaigns, some of us do advocacy, some of us are advisors, lobbyists, some of us negotiate, some of us are activists, we are from different spectrums, but the thing is, we need to know who we are, its important. We need to define what our interests are, because it will affect how we present ourselves and we need to know how we use each other in different circumstances,” Ms. Ayi-Bonte emphasized.

She said, IRC Ghana for instance worked mainly around government and with government and if it changed focus from one of advocacy to that of activism, that chances that it will lose its influence will be quite high.

Ms. Ayi-Bonte explained that there are other partners who were doing activism and doing it effectively, and therefore, partnering them to do it better was crucial.

Championing an evidence based advocacy was critical, stressing “sometimes we have the information, we are passionate, there are also people who are studying it and have different results, but we don’t necessarily link it on our advocacy activities.” She further call on all partners to sharpen their advocacy tools, work with the right partners to achieve the needed results.

 

Source: moderghana.com

CSOs urged to partner government – WASH

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) have been urged to partner government for collective action towards achieving Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

A statement issued by IRC, an international think-and-do tank, and copied to the Ghana News Agency on Wednesday said one significant issue facing developing countries, of which Ghana was no exception, in the area of WASH was the waning funding to the sector.

It said Ghana’s case was even more complicated, considering the country’s recent reclassification as a lower middle income country.

It noted that though this might present opportunities for the WASH sector, it could initially constrain the sector’s ability to attract funding, especially when about 90 per cent of the sectors’ funding came from loans and grants.

Explaining the funding challenges that confront the WASH sector and the need to explore partnership opportunities to carry out effective advocacy to ensure the achievement of the WASH SDGs, the Country Director of IRC, Mrs Vida Duti, said there was a decline in donor funding to the sector; and because most of the programmes in the WASH sector were ongoing, sector actors may not feel the impact, stressing, “but we should be preparing and looking at how as a sector, we can adjust to make collective impact.”

In a presentation to kick start the learning session on advocacy issues around capacities, innovative financing and exploring partnerships for collective action towards achieving WASH SDGs at the 27th Edition of the Mole Conference at Big Ada in Ghana, Mrs Duti said doubling funding for the WASH sector through domestic resource mobilization was critical for an unimpeded SDGs implementation.

However, she noted that the outlook and drivers for domestic resource mobilization, currently does not look favorable for the sector and therefore called for a more concerted efforts among stakeholders in the WASH sector to manage the transition in order to avoid budget slippages.

The changing funding and partnership landscape, according to the IRC Ghana Country Director, had a lot of implications for advocacy work among CSOs in the WASH sector in Ghana.

She said the numerous complexities being experienced in the sector has a waning impact on WASH sector dynamism and “so the question is that how can we remain dynamic in a sector that is losing its dynamism,” she asked.

On how to use advocacy to drive the SDG agenda, Mrs Duti, said CSOs should partner government to redirect the path to achieving the SDGs on WASH.

“We cannot sit back and say this is government business, it’s every body’s business, but the government is supposed to lead and therefore, we need to look at how together we can work to support government in driving the agenda towards achieving the SDGs targets,” she said.

Mrs Duti who spoke on the theme “Overview of Step-Change-for-WASH… Forging Partnerships for SDGs and Follow-Up Discussions,” advised stakeholders to reflect on critical issues in the sector, especially on best practices other partners were implementing and achieving results that others could learn from to drive the advocacy agenda. “Move out from lamentations and begin to reflect on how to build synergies around advocacy so that collectively, we can move the WASH sector forward,” she urged.

Mole Conference is one of the biggest Multi-Stakeholder annual platforms in the WASH sector in Ghana.

The Platform, named after the venue of the maiden edition, Mole in the Northern Region of Ghana, is organized by the Coalition of NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) and brings together sector practitioners from NGOs, Government, Private Operators, Networks, CBOs, and CSOs to dialogue, learn and share knowledge/information on specific themes that affect the sector.

 

Source: ghanabusinessnews.com

Employ New Innovations That Are Deployable On Large Scale to Address Sanitation Challenge–CONIWAS Chair

 

The ever increasing need for developing countries to ensure that better sanitation services are provided to their citizens has never been evident than now. Over 2.5 billion people, representing about 40 per cent of the world’s population practice open defecation or lack adequate sanitation facilities. The effect of this phenomenon can be dire, especially on human health and the environment in general.

Poor sanitation alone accounts for about 700,000 child deaths from diarrhea each year. Chronic diarrhea can hinder child development by impeding the absorption of essential nutrients and reducing the effectiveness of life-saving vaccines.

Making sanitation facilities and public services that work for everybody and that keep waste out of the environment is a major problem in developing countries. The toilets, sewers, and wastewater treatment facilities in advanced societies require more land and water, and they are costly to build, operate and maintain. The existing systems are cheaper, but unappealing because they do not kill pathogens, they retain odour and attract insects.

It is in view of this that the Chair Person of the Coalition of NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) Mrs. Maria Don-Chebe is of the view that solving the sanitation challenge in the developing part of the world of which Ghana is no exception, will require new innovations that are deployable on a large scale, especially in highly populated areas.

Welcoming participants to the 27th edition of the Mole Conference at Big Ada in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana, Mrs. Don-Chebe charged players in the WASH sector to come out with innovative and cost effective designs of WASH products and services to increase access to persons with disabilities and children, adding there was the need for innovative financing to enable poorer households to build and use sustainable and resilient latrines, especially in flood prone areas.

The Mrs. Don-Chebe said the fight to end sanitation and poverty was far from over since there was still a lot of hard to service communities yet to be reached with safe and affordable sanitation and there called for sector actors to begin to think outside the box in order to address the challenges confronting the sector.

The CONIWAS Chair, however, expressed delight that stakeholders in this year’s Mole Conference would be dilating on issues that would directly address the challenges, share and learn the practical success stories that are working very well around sanitation financing, WASH in Schools and Health facilities and the quest to achieve Open Defecation Free status.

Mrs. Don-Chebe said there was the need also for participants to share superior ideas on how to effectively build the capacities of WASH sector actors to carry out their advocacy roles effectively as well as track the WASH sector performance.

She said CONIWAS will continue to partner with all stakeholders in the WASH sector, including the Government to ensure that there is a vibrant WASH sector in Ghana which will work towards achieving the much desired SDGs on water and sanitation for all.

“it is clear that no single actor can achieve this laudable goal alone, there is the urgent need to ensure that all relevant actors come on board the SDG 6 boat, we in the Civil Society Organization (CSO) sector are aware that we have an even greater role to play in our collective effort at improving water and sanitation services for all,” Mrs. Don-Chebe stressed.

Making a presentation under the theme: “Spaces and Opportunities for CSO Advocacy Around SDGs,” the Country Director of WaterAid Ghana, Mr. Abdul-Nashiru Mohammed advised WASH sector actors to get out of their WASH boxes and work with other sector institutions if they want to make remarkable achievements in the SDGs on WASH.

To ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all, Mr. Mohammed said calls for stronger collaboration and partnerships.

According to the WaterAid Ghana Country Director, WASH underpinned progress on a whole range of SDGs including those on health, education and gender equality, adding it was therefore crucial for governments across the world, including the Government of Ghana to recognize the importance of WASH for the country’s economic and social development. “Government should ensure that the goal on WASH is imbedded in national development and other action plans” Mr. Mohammed stressed.

WASH, the WaterAid Country Director explained should be seen as an essential component of an integrated approach to tackling poverty, hunger, health and inequality. “the goals and targets supported by WASH access include a good number of them, for instance, ending poverty, WASH is related to that, ending hunger, WASH is related to that, ensuring healthy lives, WASH is related to that, ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education, WASH is related to that, achieving gender equality, WASH is related to that, and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, WASH is related to that.” Mr. Mohammed emphasized.

Mole Conference is one of the biggest Multi-Stakeholder annual platforms in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector in Ghana. The Platform, named after the venue of the maiden edition, Mole in the Northern Region of Ghana, is organized by the Coalition of NGOs in Water and Sanitation (CONIWAS) and brings together sector practitioners from NGOs, Government, Private Operators, Networks, CBOs, CSOs, etc. to dialogue, learn and share knowledge/information on specific themes that affect the sector.

 

Source: modernghana.com

WASH asked to surmount funding challenges

WASH

 

The Director of Water in the former Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH), Mr. Emmanuel Addae, has called on all actors in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sector in Ghana to reposition themselves in order to surmount the funding challenges in the sector, as well as partner with the Government to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on water and sanitation by 2030.

Mr. Addae said the theme: “Repositioning CSOs towards achieving the WASH SDGs: The Role of Sector Partners” was apt and appropriate for this year’s Mole Conference, especially the challenging times the sector finds itself now.

According to Mr. Addae, realizing the need to reposition the WASH sector means that, there was an admission that the sector was not well positioned now and that there was the urgent need for actors in the WASH sector to strategize effectively to ensure that they put their feet on firm ground, to do that requires the sector to forge stronger relationships with the Government.

“We have to find out whether our relationship with Government is good enough, are we transparent? Are we accountable? Are we diligent in what we do and do we provide data even for our own parent organization and for that matter the Government?

I believe these are some of the questions we need to ask ourselves as we reposition ourselves,” Mr. Addae emphasized.

The Director of Water in the former Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing who was speaking at the 27th Edition of the Mole Conference on 22nd November, 2016 at Big Ada in Greater Accra Region, explained that Ghana is currently implementing the SDGs and the success of its implementation required the collective efforts of all sector actors, including CONIWAS. “Our dear country was able to achieve the SDG on water and I can say we were among a few in sub-Saharan Africa that achieved this feat.

“We, therefore, can rely on CONIWAS to help the Government to achieve the SDGs on water come 2030,” Mr. Addae added.

On dwindling funding for the WASH sector, he charged sector actors to make cost benefit allowance for every funding they receive from donors, as well as ensure that their projects are of great use to the people they serve.

He said resource allocation for the WASH sector has been dwindling for several reasons, one of which he cited is Ghana’s current status as a lower middle income country and as a result of that donors are now turning their attention to other least developed countries, which Mr. Addae added posed a great challenge to the sector.

In view of that, Mr. Emmanuel Addae urged stakeholders at this year’s Mole Conference to make cogent suggestions and strategies that would effectively mitigate the challenges in the short term and combat the challenges in the longer term.

On the Water Sector Strategic Plan, the Director, Water, of the MWRWH indicated the plan was being rolled out and it was proper for stakeholders in the sector to actively partake in its implementation as well as enable them to consort as they plan for water activities in the coming years.

Mr. Emmanuel Addae, however, expressed disquiet about Ghana’s poor performance in the SDGs on sanitation, despite the strong showing the country put up in the area of water and said water and sanitation was intertwine and therefore appealed to stakeholders to put their wheels to the shoulders to ensure that Ghana achieved its objectives in sanitation by the year 2030.

Mr. Emmanuel Addae, who officially declared the conference open, called on participants to deliberate and work towards issues that will ensure that, Ghana does not only achieve its water for all policy, but improve sanitation and hygiene by 2025.

 

Source: thechronicle.com.gh

Reposition To Surmount The Challenges In The WASH Sector ─ Director, Water, Advises Sector Actor

Director, Water, Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) Mr. Emmanuel Addae

Director, Water, Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) Mr. Emmanuel Addae

 

The Director, Water, Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) Mr. Emmanuel Addae, has called on all actors in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sector in Ghana to reposition themselves in order to surmount the funding challenges in the sector as well as partner with the Government to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on water and sanitation by 2030.

Mr. Addae said the theme: “Repositioning CSOs towards achieving the WASH SDGs: The Role of Sector Partners” was apt and appropriate for this year’s Mole Conference, especially the challenging times the sector finds itself now.

According to Mr. Addae, realizing the need to reposition the WASH sector means that, there was an admission that the sector was not well positioned now and that there was the urgent need for actors in the WASH sector to strategize effectively to ensure that they put their feet in firm ground and to do that, required the sector to forge stronger relationships with the Government. “We have to find out whether our relationship with Government is good enough, are we transparent? Are we accountable? Are we diligent in what we do? and do we provide data even for our own parent organization and for that matter the Government, I believe these are some of the questions we need to ask ourselves as we reposition the ourselves,” Mr. Addae emphasized.

Mr. Addae who was speaking at the 27TH Edition of the Mole Conference on 22ND November, 2016 at Big Ada in Greater Accra Region, explained that, Ghana is currently implementing the SDGs and the success of its implementation required the collective efforts of all sector actors including CONIWAS. “Our dear country achieved was able to achieve the SDG on water and I can say, we were among a few in sub-Saharan Africa that achieved this feet, we therefore that we can rely on CONIWAS to help the Government to achieve the SDGs on water come 2030,” Mr. Addae added.

On dwindling funding for the WASH sector, the Director, Water, charged sector actors to make cost benefit allowance for every funding they received from donors as well as ensure that their projects are of great use to the people they serve.

He said resource allocation for the WASH sector has been dwindling for several reasons, one of which he cited is Ghana’s current status as a lower middle income country and as a result of that donors are now turning their attention to other least developed countries and that Mr. Addae added posed a great challenge to the sector.

In view of that, Mr. Emmanuel Addae urged stakeholders at this year’s Mole Conference to make cogent suggestions and strategies that would effectively mitigate the challenges in the short term and combat the challenges in the longer term.

On the Water Sector Strategic Plan, the Director, Water, of the MWRWH indicated the plan was being rolled out and it was proper for stakeholders in the sector to actively partake in its implementation as well as enable them to consort as they plan for water activities in the coming years.

Mr. Emmanuel Addae, however, expressed disquiet about Ghana’s poor performance in the SDGs on sanitation, despite the strong showing the country put up in the area of water and said water and sanitation was intertwine and therefore appealed to stakeholders to put their wheels to the shoulders to ensure that Ghana achieved its objectives in sanitation by the year 2030.

Mr. Emmanuel Addae, who officially declared the conference opened called on participants to deliberate and work towards issues that will ensure that, Ghana does not only achieve its water for all policy, but improve sanitation and hygiene by 2025.

 

Source: modernghana.com

Water Aid increases access to WASH facilities

 

The Intervention by Water Aid Ghana, has led to an increased access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities in five districts across the country.

Mr Abdul-Nashiru Mohammed, Country Director of Water Aid Ghana said over 150,000 people have been able to access safe water whilst about 90,000 others had access to sanitation facilities through the Hongkong  Shanghai Banking Corporation Water Programme (HWP) implemented in the five districts.

Water Aid Ghana implemented the HWP in Wa, and Bolgatanga municipalities, Tamale metropolis, Birem North and Afram Plains North districts from 2012 to 2016 to improve access to WASH facilities.

Mr Mohammed, who was speaking at a close-out workshop of the HWP in Tamale, said 104 communities in the five districts were provided with WASH facilities whiles institutional latrines were built in 43 schools.

The close-out workshop, attended by officials from the beneficiary districts and Water Aid Ghana’s partner organisations, was to assess the delivery of the HWP.

Mr Mohammed said WASH facilities were provided in some communities that did not have electricity to power them adding efforts were being made to connect such facilities to the national grid for the benefit of the people.

Mr Sulaiman Issah Bello, Programme Manager of Water Aid Ghana who outlined the organisation’s programme of work said it would in the next three years; focus more on water provision to schools and healthcare centres for improved WASH practices.

 

Source: modernghana.com